Tag Archives: drawings

Raffle Tickets as classroom rewards

There are times when a chance of winning a prize is as effective as the prize itself

Classroom reward tickets

Teachers can give raffle tickets to students as a reward for good behavior. The more tickets a child earns, the greater their chance of winning the reward.

A creative way to reward students in a classroom setting is through the use of raffle tickets. Tickets can used in a variety of ways to help kids maintain or improve their focus and behavior during class time and even encourage them to think outside the box.

Whenever you witness a desired behavior, reward that student with a raffle ticket (or more, if you like). It doesn’t matter how small or seemingly trivial that behavior is – if you’d likely see more of it, reward it with a ticket!

Announce that at the end of the day or the week, you will collect all the tickets that have been given out and will draw a single ticket from a box at random to select a winner. Kids will enjoy the feel-good factor of creating a cache of tickets, knowing that the more tickets they revive, the better their chances of winning the prize.

You can decide whether your students will need more than one ticket to enter the drawing. If a child has not received enough raffle tickets in the established timeframe, he or she is excluded from the current prize draw but can try again the following day or week.

Some examples of prizes include 10 minutes of free computer time, a one-day late homework pass, a candy bar … the possibilities are limitless.

Another idea is to give students 2 raffle tickets to start the day, but they can’t write their names on their tickets until the end of the day. Students can also earn tickets for staying on task or doing excellent work. If they break a classroom rule, take a ticket away. At the end of the day, collect all the tickets and do a drawing for a small prize, class money, or a treat.

The tickets can also be used as “bonus points.” A ticket is given as a reward for making a good decision in class, doing extra work, etc. If a student with bonus points finds that he or she didn’t receive quite as high a grade as desired on a homework assignment or quiz, the bonus points can be redeemed to help boost the grade by a point or two.

If you print the tickets yourself, you can create unique tickets that aren’t easily duplicated and are individualized to suit the type of reward. Include space for a checkmark or other indication that you’ve issued the ticket and that it’s authentic and ready for use.

Important information to have on your tickets

Make a checklist of what a participant will need to knowTicket making checklist

Last time, we looked at the building blocks of raffle tickets that wow – quality perforated paper, brilliant ink and paper colors and raffle ticket software that offers a template so you can design and print your own tickets. Let’s not forget the nuts and bolts: the information you simply must have for a successful event.

Keep and refer to a checklist of what a participant will need to know about your event. A good raffle ticket will provide the drawing’s name, location and date; the cost of the ticket; and your organization name and contact information – especially if the entrant need not be present to win the prize. Consider including a brief (one- or two-line) description of the prize or prizes, as space allows.

Don’t forget to select the font or typeface for the information you will print on the ticket. This is an important step because different fonts can evoke different emotions – some whimsical and fun, others serious. Check your computer’s system to see what fonts you have installed and which are best suited to reflect the tone of your drawing.

Be sure to give some thought to the overall appearance of the ticket. An attractive design can be created by using your organization or event logo as a focal point of the ticket to add visual interest. Additional artwork can be used to complement a logo, but avoid creating a cluttered look that distracts from the drawing information.

If you’re working with a template from raffle ticket software, check to see whether you’re able to upload an image or logo from your computer onto the ticket and follow the instructions provided.

These guidelines also apply to the ticket stub. While the stub is, by definition, the smallest portion of the ticket, by no means does that make it any less important than the main part of the ticket. After all, it’s the part you retain for the drawing itself – without it, you can’t choose a winner! You’ll need the ticketholder’s name and contact information, including phone number and/or e-mail address, at a minimum.

Don’t forget to number the tickets! Good raffle ticket software will allow you to number the tickets forward or backward sequentially with the start number of your choice, so if you want to start with No. 123 and end with No. 3465, you can. Best of all is software that tells you exactly how many total pages of tickets you will be printing out based on how many tickets you need, and print them out in stack or single-sheet order. No more unpleasant surprises!

Have fun designing your raffle tickets, and may your next event be a great success!

Ideas for organizing your next drawing

Successful organizations have known about fund raising through the power of raffle drawings for many years. At the same time, they may not realize the full benefits of holding a drawing. Here are just a few ways raffle drawings have benefited organizations:

Raffle drawings can provide an opportunity for members of the public who cannot physically attend an event to still support that event or cause. By holding a raffle drawing, your income isn’t limited to a single, in-person fundraising opportunity; you also build invaluable goodwill in your community.

Some forethought regarding raffle drawings can lead to an income stream before and long after the date of your event. Printing your Web site address on ticket stubs – the part each and every drawing participant holds on to – gives you lasting marketing exposure to a relevant audience and can help draw potential supporters to you in the days and weeks following your drawing.

Smart organizations know that there is strength in numbers when it comes to raffle drawings. Forming a joint venture – teaming up with another group whose mission or interest is related to yours – benefits everyone involved by helping both groups reach a larger audience than either group would on their own. And larger audiences mean larger income.

Don’t pass up raffle drawings as a way to support your organization. Be one of the many groups that have enjoyed great success through their own creative efforts.

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How Raffle Drawings Benefit Organizations

Successful organizations have known about fund raising through the power of raffle drawings for many years.  At the same time, they may not realize the full benefits of holding a drawing.  Here are just a few ways raffle drawings have benefited organizations:

Raffle drawings can provide an opportunity for members of the public who cannot physically attend an event to still support that event or cause.  By holding a raffle drawing, your income isn’t limited to a single, in-person fundraising opportunity; you also build invaluable goodwill in your community.

Some forethought regarding raffle drawings can lead to an income stream before and long after the date of your event.  Printing your website address on ticket stubs – the part each and every drawing participant holds on to – gives you lasting marketing exposure to a relevant audience and can help draw potential supporters to you in the days and weeks following your drawing.

Smart organizations know that there is strength in numbers when it comes to raffle drawings.  Forming a joint venture – teaming up with another group whose mission or interest is related to yours – benefits everyone involved by helping both groups reach a larger audience than either group would on their own.  And larger audiences mean larger income.

Don’t pass up raffle drawings as a way to support your organization.  Be one of the many groups that have enjoyed great success through their own creative efforts.

 

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Summertime Opportunities

I bet you’d rather be at the beach, or camping, or participating in nearly any outdoor activity.  But you’re not.  You’re stuck behind your computer and starting to resent being saddled with your next fund raising project.

You don’t have to feel guilty.  I’d rather be at the beach too.

The secret to happiness is to get your fund raising activities – and yourself – outdoors.  You can combine the two – selling tickets AND enjoying yourself – with just a little creative finesse.

When’s the last time you treated yourself to a car show?  How about an outdoor concert?  If those are few and far between, what about a firemen’s field days or local farmers market?

All it takes is a few phone calls to the right people, and you have a good chance of getting a table at the event where you can sell your raffle tickets.  Who knows?  You might even get the space, admission, and great parking all thrown in as a donation to your charity.  (You’ll never know if you don’t ask).

These are fantastic places to sell your tickets.  The crowds are concentrated, so you’ll have heavy traffic, and there is usually down time before the event starts and the crowds are looking for something to do.  These people are not only generally in a good mood, but they showed up with money in their pockets set aside for spending.

Best of all, you get to take breaks where you can walk around to enjoy the sights, sounds and – gasp – the FOOD!

It’s a win-win situation.

So stop feeling guilty about wanting to get outside.  You’ve got a game plan.  Go put it into practice and enjoy the results!

 

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Get the word out

Send information about your drawing to local news outlets – TV, newspapers, community calendars, local-info web sites,  chambers of commerce, even posters in store entryways – They’ll often mention your organization or event and sometimes they’ll even send a reporter or local dignitary to your event.

It’s free advertising that will help to draw more interest!

 

Think outside the raffle

Numbered tickets have many uses above and beyond raffles

Did you realize that you can use your Raffle Ticket software for many other types of tickets and promotions? Here are a few ideas you might be able to use next time you hold a gathering:
Our Raffle Ticket Software Program makes many different kinds of tickets.
Event Tickets: Whether you are charging admission for an event or not, you can produce numbered tickets for attendees. The tickets lend an air of professionalism to your event. Some people will even hold on to their tickets as a souvenir or to remind them to save the date for next year.

Drawings: Use the ticket’s stub to hold a drawing. Even if you only have a very small door prize to offer, the drawing gives your attendees a reason to hold onto their ticket and therefore keep your information with them. Holding the drawing toward the end of your event will also give them a reason to stay longer and hopefully provide your organization with more income.

Parking Passes: Put your organization’s name, address, phone number and web site on a parking pass. Not only is it useful in making sure your parking lot isn’t full with someone else’s traffic on the days you need it most, but you’ll also benefit from a built-in marketing campaign that will be driven near and far on your attendee’s dashboards for days after your event.

You are competing against TV, radio, billboards, Facebook, text messages, e-mail and hundreds of other advertising distractions. Make the most of the marketing resources you already have and see a real difference in your fund raising results.

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Springtime Opportunities

As warmer temperatures arrive, a whole new season of craft shows begin to fill the calendar. Spring is a busy time and people frequent shows looking to pick up ideas and supplies for their favorite pastimes.

Water Lily

By offering a raffle during a craft show, you are able to add another level of fun and excitement for participants while at the same time, sharing information about your organization or cause.

Because most show organizers require advance registration to reserve a space, some planning is helpful. Finding where craft shows are being held and registering with organizers in time can be tricky. In larger towns, you may have a number of shows from which to choose on a given weekend, while in smaller communities there may only be one or two shows a month.

Many times, upcoming craft shows will be listed in the classified section or advertised in a display ad in the local newspaper – you may even see signs posted along streets in the neighborhood where the show is to be held. Keep in mind that these listings are often notices of shows whose dates are rapidly approaching and whose registration dates have passed (meaning there may not be enough time for you to participate in that show), but by contacting either the organizers themselves or the facility where the show is to take place,  you will have a direct line to upcoming opportunities.

The Internet can be a great source of information for larger shows. Websites such as http://www.fairsandfestivals.net list a wide variety of shows sometimes months in advance of the show dates, organized by state. While details are made available only to paid members, the show names can be looked up separately through an online search engine such as Google or Yahoo. Other sites include http://festivalnet.com/craft_shows.html and http://www.artscraftsshowbusiness.com/default.aspx. You can also search the name of your town with the phrase “craft show” for smaller shows.

 

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